Conservation Program Helps Central West Landholders Protect Their Bushland

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22nd July 2010, 02:32pm - Views: 404





Community Rural Farming Nature Conservation Trust Of NSW 1 image








CONTACT:




Jodie Lewin





02 9564 0576





0448 810 054





jodie@nct.org.au





MEDIA RELEASE







 

     ²² July 2010




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Protect your own private bushland reserve

Central West landholders will once again have the opportunity to protect the natural bushland on their

properties forever thanks to a conservation agreement program being delivered by the Nature Conservation

Trust of New South Wales.



Following the successful completion of the first round of the Central West Conservation Covenant Program,

the Nature Conservation Trust is again seeking landholders who want to protect natural bushland on their

properties through a permanent conservation agreement with the organisation. 


Properties will be selected through an assessment process that will focus on the type of native vegetation

present, the size of the area, the location of the vegetation in relation to other patches of bushland, and the

presence of important plants and animals such as Glossy Black Cockatoos, Swift Parrots and Diamond

Firetails.


Incentive funding for participating landholders has been made available to the program by the Central West

Catchment Management Authority. This funding can be used to contribute to on-ground works such as feral

animal and weed control, fencing and improving habitat for wildlife. The Nature Conservation Trust will

provide ongoing management advice, information and assistance.


Central West landholder Andrew Knop, who recently protected 730 hectares of bushland on his property near

Dubbo with a Nature Conservation Trust covenant, explains his motivation for protecting his land.


“A covenant protects native bushland and the wildlife it supports for future generations and helps to preserve

all your hard work,” said Andrew.


“Putting a covenant on my property means the restoration works will be protected forever.”


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Andrew’s property forms part of the Sappa Bulga Ranges, which is a significant remnant of native vegetation

in a landscape that has been largely cleared and modified for agriculture. There are two Endangered

Ecological Communities on the property – Box-Gum Woodland and Fuzzy Box Woodland – and a number of

threatened bird species present, including the endangered Glossy Black Cockatoo. The property also has

potential habitat for many more threatened animal and plant species.


Project Officer for the Nature Conservation Trust, Danielle Smetana, said that protecting native vegetation on

private property is critical for protecting biodiversity.


"Native vegetation in the Central West Catchment has been highly modified and remnants of bushland on

private land provide important hubs of biodiversity to help maintain regional landscape health," said Danielle.


"Protecting these remnants is vital if we are to ensure the survival of our unique plants and animals."


The Central West Conservation Covenant Program is a joint project between the Nature Conservation Trust

and the Central West Catchment Management Authority, supported by the Australian Government's Caring

for our Country initiative.


To find out more about the program, visit www.nct.org.au or contact Danielle Smetana in Nature

Conservation Trust’s Orange office on 02 6365 7881. Expressions of interest close 13th August 2010.


ENDS


MEDIA CONTACT:

Jodie Lewin - Fundraising and Public Relations Manager


Ph: 02 9564 0576


Mob: 0448 810 054


Email: jodie@nct.org.au


IMAGE ATTACHED:  Project Officer for the Nature Conservation Trust, Danielle Smetana, with Dubbo

landholder Andrew Knop, who has protected the bushland on his property with a Nature Conservation Trust

covenant.








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